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Department of Social Sciences
Course Catalog
93 Courses


COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS201 2019-2 ECONOMICS-PRINCIPLES/PROBLEMS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course presents the basic principles of economic analysis and their application to contemporary economic problems and supports the further study of economics and related disciplines in the social sciences. The course is organized into two primary branches: microeconomics, the study of the behavior of individuals, households, and firms in making decisions, in a market economy and the application of this theory to contemporary issues in both domestic and global markets; and macroeconomics, the study of the performance, structure, and behavior of the whole economy including issues of national income, output, consumption, unemployment, inflation, as well as fiscal and monetary policy. In addition, the course includes instruction on personal finance, focusing specifically on major purchase decisions (home and auto), insurance, basic investing, and investing for retirement. This instruction is intended not only to improve individual financial decision-making but also to equip Cadets with the ability to address the financial issues of their future Soldiers. Cadets develop analytical tools in order to assess the economic implications of policy decisions by military and government officials and to improve their own decision-making process.
2024 2
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2024 8
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2026 1
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2026 8
2027 1
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2027 8

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS202 2019-2 AMERICAN POLITICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course explores the American political system - its philosophical underpinnings, the structure and behavior of formal government institutions, and the influence of informal political actors within the political construct. The course introduces the discipline of political science by exploring a broad range of literature: classics of American politics, leading political theory, and contemporary reading. Cadets will apply their knowledge of political ideas, institutions, and behavior to public policy making and demonstrate critical analysis of contemporary debates in American politics. Finally, this course provides cadets with an understanding of the professional norms and responsibilities associated with their role as military officers within the American system of government.
2024 2
2024 5
2025 1
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2025 8
2026 1
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2026 8
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2027 9

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS252 2021-1 ADVANCED AMERICAN POLITICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course explores the American political system, its philosophical underpinnings, the structure and behavior of formal government institutions, and the influence of informal political actors within the political construct. The course introduces the discipline of political science by exploring a broad range of literature: classics of American politics, leading political theory, and contemporary reading. Cadets will apply their knowledge of political ideas, institutions, and behavior to public policy-making and demonstrate critical analysis of contemporary debates in American politics. Cadets enrolled in SS252 are expected to conduct advanced undergraduate research that includes identifying additional readings related to policy debates for incorporation into policy-related classes, as well as a miniature literature review as part of their culminating research paper. These analytical research requirements exceed those levied on SS202 cadets. Further, SS252 cadets are exposed to additional seminal works in political science throughout the course, including classical political philosophy, primary historical documents from early American politicians and political thinkers, and contemporary works on civil-military relations. Finally, this course provides cadets with an understanding of the professional norms and responsibilities associated with their role as military officers within the American system of government. Aided through additional readings, this emphasis on civil-military relations focuses on contemporary and historical debates over the appropriate role of military involvement in policy development and the political process.
2024 2
2025 1
2025 2
2026 1
2026 2
2027 1
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS289B 2023-2 INTRO TO IA SENIOR THESIS 1.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course prepares students to participate in the International Affairs capstone Senior Thesis in the following term. The course will be conducted through a combination of class (group) meetings and 1-on-1 individual meetings with Course Director, both types to be scheduled at the latter's discretion. It familiarizes cadets with the research procedures, techniques, and topics for future study undertaken in support of independent research, as determined by the faculty advisor (course director). In general, cadets will explore a topic in detail to create a literature review and understand the current methodology used to study that topic. Grades will be determined through individual assignments, including class participation, response papers, and research building-block assignments. The outcome of the course is a research design that forms the basis for the cadet's senior thesis.
2024 2
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS291B 2023-1 INTRO TO IA SENIOR PROJECT 1.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This introductory course prepares students who will participate in the International Affairs capstone Senior Project in the following term. It familiarizes cadets with the research procedures, techniques, and topics for future study, undertaken in support of an outside client. The scope of the course depends on the needs of the project and the needs of the cadets, as determined by the faculty advisor (course director). In general, cadets will select topics, form teams, meet with the client, and begin the research process. Grades will be determined through individual and group assignments, including class participation, response papers, and research building-block assignments. The outcome of the course is a research design that forms the basis for the cadet team's research paper for the client
2025 1
2026 1
2027 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS307 2020-2 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE The objectives of this course are to provide cadets with an introduction to the fundamental concepts of international relations and the analytical tools necessary to evaluate two fundamental questions: "Why do states do what they do?" and "What causes conflict and cooperation in the international system?" Emphasizing intellectual pluralism, SS307 focuses on the value of applying different theoretical perspectives to historic cases and contemporary events in international affairs. Cadets will employ international relations theory to examine key issues such as the role of power and the use of force in the international system, the international political economy, the role of identity and culture in state behavior, foreign policy decision-making, and the role of morality and ethics in international affairs.
2024 2
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2024 8
2025 1
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2025 8
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2026 3
2026 8
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COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS357 2020-2 ADV INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE The objectives of this course are to provide cadets with an introduction to the fundamental concepts of international relations and the analytical tools necessary to evaluate two fundamental questions: "Why do states do what they do?" and "What causes conflict and cooperation in the international system?" Emphasizing intellectual pluralism, SS357 focuses on the value of applying different theoretical perspectives to historic cases and contemporary events in international affairs. Cadets will employ international relations theory to examine key issues such as the role of power and the use of force in the international system, the international political economy, the role of identity and culture in state behavior, foreign policy decision-making, and the role of morality and ethics in international affairs. While the course content of SS357 is similar to that of SS307 (International Relations), SS357 is designed as an introductory course primarily for cadets majoring in International Affairs.
2025 1
2026 1
2027 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS360 2024-1 POL SCI RESEARCH METHODS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course is an introduction to research methods for political science majors. It serves two main purposes. First, this course introduces research design and the myriad methodologies employed by scholars as they engage in debates within the political science community and beyond. This course will cover many aspects of research design, but will focus primarily on the ability to ask good questions and to craft research plans to best answer those questions. Second, the course is an introduction to some of the major debates within political science. The course equips students with the tools to understand and conduct research in political science in upper-level electives.
2024 2
2025 1
2025 2
2026 1
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS364 2005-2 GAME THEORY 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE Game theory is designed to provide students with the tools necessary to think through the various courses of action available as they face a uncertain situations, determine market reaction to each alternative, identify the costs and benefits of each course of action and select the course of action that minimizes cost while maximizing benefits. The purpose of this course is to introduce cadets to the application of strategic thinking to tactical scenarios. This course consists of two components that are taught concurrently. The first component is the introduction of basic game theory and the second component is the application of those theories to tactical and strategic choice scenarios.
2024 2
2024 8
2025 2
2025 8
2026 2
2026 8
2027 1
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2027 8

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS366 2020-2 COMPARATIVE POLITICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE SS366 examines critical questions in political science: Why do regimes succeed, fail, and change? What causes democracy to emerge? Why are some countries torn by conflict while others are peaceful? Cadets will analyze states, regimes, society, identity, and political action in order to address these vital issues related to the internal workings of a country. As well as being central to the discipline of political science, these questions also play an important role in world politics and the formulation of U.S. foreign policy. Through examining countries around the world, SS366 uses real-world examples and empirics to discern potentially generalizable relationships. Studying Comparative Politics will provide cadets the tools to critically analyze these important questions.
2024 2
2025 1
2025 2
2025 8
2026 1
2026 2
2026 8
2027 1
2027 2
2027 8

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS368 2024-1 ECONOMETRICS I 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course is designed to teach students how to quantify, test, and employ economic theories as they are used in real world applications. The course covers the use of economic theory and data in the construction, estimation, and interpretation of econometric models. Special emphasis is placed on estimation of parameters of economic models and statistical inference using estimated models to determine the validity of economic theories. The primary mathematical tool employed in the course is multiple regression analysis. A number of applications demonstrate the use of the techniques studied.
2024 2
2025 1
2025 2
2026 1
2026 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS370 2019-2 MASS MEDIA & AMER POLITICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This seminar introduces cadets to what is perhaps the single most influential private institution in the American political system, oftentimes referred to as the fourth branch or fourth estate of American government. This course examines the major concepts, theoretical frameworks, and substantive issues surrounding the study of the media as a conduit between the people and the government and as a political actor in it s own right. In particular, the roles, motivations, and effects of the constitutionally protected media on American political institutions and policymaking are extensively probed. The latter part of the course is dedicated to the study of the relationship between the military and the media, and prominent guest speakers are featured throughout the course to add context and practical application to the theories learned in class. The class includes a trip section to New York City to meet with journalists and news executives from national media outlets to round out the educational experience.
2024 2
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS372 2020-2 POLITICS OF CHINA 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE SS372 is a seminar-style course designed to provide a framework for understanding and analyzing China?s history, economics, domestic politics, and foreign policy. To do so, cadets study the history and current structure of the Chinese regime in order to explore the sources of power and legitimacy in the People?s Republic of China. Domestic challenges and opportunities receive attention as the class critically analyzes policy choices. In the foreign policy realm, the class examines sources of continuity and change, seeking to explain current actions and predict future responses.
2024 8
2025 1
2026 1
2027 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS373 2020-1 THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This seminar examines the concept of executive power and authority with particular emphasis on the institution of the presidency in the American political system. The course will analyze the constitutional origins and evolution of the presidency. We will place particular emphasis on the formal rules and informal norms that developed since the Founding and frame presidential behavior. We will analyze the various factors that influence the perpetual transformation of the institutional organization and operation of the modern executive branch. The course will examine the dynamic relationships the executive branch maintains with other branches of government, the media, the public, and other key stakeholders and how these relationships shape the development of public policy.
2025 1
2026 1
2027 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS374 2020-2 POLITICS OF NORTHEAST ASIA 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE SS374 is a seminar course designed to challenge cadets to think about why East Asian actors ? states, non-state actors, organizations, and individuals ? do what they do, both within and beyond the region. Students will apply the social scientific method and various social science theories to explain how and why East Asian actors make certain policy choices. Students will explore how pursuits of national interests create competition, cooperation, and conflict across political, economic, and military spectrums. Cadets will integrate and apply knowledge to describe, explain, analyze, or predict international affairs and domestic political developments as well as identify implications and develop feasible policy options.
2025 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS375 2020-2 POL OF THE POST-SOVIET STATES 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE SS375 explores the fascinating - and often confounding - politics of Russia and the other states that once comprised the Soviet Union. Recognizing the role that historical legacies play in shaping the region's contemporary politics, the course begins with a review of the political, economic, and social history of the Soviet empire and its abrupt collapse in 1991. The course then shifts to an exploration of contemporary post-Soviet politics, utilizing political science theories and methods to explore a wide variety of political phenomena in the region including democratization, authoritarianism, mass mobilization, economic transition and reform, governance and corruption, nationalist conflict, and more. Finally, the course examines the international relations of the post-Soviet states, with particular emphasis on the ends, ways, and means that Russia uses to advance its strategic interests in the region and beyond.
2024 2
2025 2
2025 8
2025 9
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS376 2019-2 AMERICAN POLITICAL DEVELOPMENT 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE American Political Development focuses on the causes, nature, and consequences of key transformative periods and central patterns in American political history that affect the relationship between the state, politics, and institutional development. The course explores patterns in the public policy process and examines historical processes to analyze American political institutions and policy outcomes from a political standpoint. Students focus on the degree to which ideas and institutions from the Founding period created stability in American politics and investigate the role of events, ideas, and other forces in leading to periods of change. After starting with an in-depth review of the American Founding, we will examine the major epochs of state development to understand their causes and effects on political institutions, politics, and public policy. Special emphasis will be placed on the rise of the unique American regulatory and welfare state. Lastly, we will examine how the course of American political development contributes to the features of today?s political environment and what these patterns of development suggest for the future of American politics.
2025 1
2026 1
2027 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS377 2020-2 POLITICS OF EUROPE 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE In SS377, cadets explore the domestic and international politics of the European states, using a wide array of political science theories and methods to explain and predict state behavior in the region. They will examine the political and economic institutions of European states as well as explain how those institutions developed over time. They will also examine the development and functioning of European international institutions with special emphasis on the institutions of the European Union. Finally, cadets will use theory to predict how European institutions might evolve in the future under the stress of various contemporary challenges. This course builds on the theoretical foundations laid by SS366 and SS307/SS357.
2025 1
2026 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS378 2020-2 GREAT POWER COMPETITION 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE One of the defining features of international relations at any point in history has been the distribution of power among the major states and the character of the political, economic, and military relationships among them. This course draws from the major schools of international relations theory to explore the underlying causes of war and peace among great powers, from the clash between Athens and Sparta in the 5th Century B.C., to great power politics of the 19th Century, the World Wars of the early 20th Century, and the Cold War between the United States and the USSR. The course concludes by examining how we might apply the theoretical and historical lessons of earlier periods to the challenge of great power politics among the United States, China, and Russia in the 21st Century.

No Course Offerings


COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS379 2019-2 UNITED STATES CONGRESS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course deals with the origins, institutional evolution, and behavior of the United States Congress. It focuses on the role of Congress in representation and policymaking within the American political system. The course addresses the development of the United States Congress, congressional campaigns and elections, the tension inherent in Members of Congress acting both as representatives for their constituents and policymakers for the nation, the structure and behavior of committees, the responsibilities of legislative leaders, and the interaction between Congress and the Executive and Judicial branches. Case studies, practical exercises, and guest lecturers are used to highlight these topics.
2024 2
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS380 2021-1 LABOR ECONOMICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course studies the nature and determinants of pay and employment. The course emphasizes the role of institutions which are significant in determining the pattern and speed of adjustment in the labor market. The traditional tools of micro and macroeconomics and econometrics are employed. Military manpower is examined as an application of the theories developed during the course.
2024 2
2024 8
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS381 2020-2 CULTURAL/POLIT ANTHROPOLOGY 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE SS381 focuses on people and explores how a group's cultural patterns shape behaviors, identity, and social and political structures. By its holistic nature, a goal of anthropology is to understand human nature, social interactions and explore the origins of modern political organizations. The discipline explores cultural variation within and among societies, regarding many issues including race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality and nationality. Students also examine the sub-discipline of applied anthropology which seeks to solve contemporary social and political problems such as ethnic conflict.

No Course Offerings


COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS382 2021-1 INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course is a theory course in which cadets develop a thorough understanding of microeconomic modeling and models; it is a prerequisite for most downstream economics courses. The course develops a methodology that economists use to study the interaction among individual economic agents (such as consumers, firms and the government) and the allocation of scarce resources among these agents. The goal is for cadets to understand optimization, markets, and to some extent policy-making, using an integrated, theoretical model. Ultimately the consequence of a change in the market environment, in public policy or in the global economy can be assessed vis-+-vis its impact on individual economic agents.
2024 2
2024 8
2025 1
2025 2
2026 1
2026 2
2027 1
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS383 2020-2 POLITICS OF THE MIDDLE EAST 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE Many countries in the Middle East suffer from significant challenges including weak states and institutions, authoritarian persistence, and economic instability. Scholars have explained these issues by assessing the role played by political culture, economic structures, colonialism and foreign interventions and states have tried to find solutions through Arab Nationalism, Pan-Arabism, Islamism and other avenues. This course examines these challenges, offers explanations for these problems, and explores potential solutions.
2024 2
2024 9
2025 2
2025 8
2025 9
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS384 2020-2 POLITICS OF LATIN AMERICA 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE SS384 examines the politics of Latin American countries by applying the theories, methodologies, and conceptual tools provided by the disciplines of comparative politics and international relations. In the course students will study phenomena such as democratic regimes, authoritarian regimes, political transitions, political participation, political institutions, socio-economic development, and foreign policy within Latin America and its member countries. At the conclusion of this course, students can apply comparative political science approaches to understand Latin American politics, have a deeper understanding of Latin American history and policies, and develop a greater familiarity with the tools of social science.
2027 1
2027 9

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS385 2021-1 HISTORY OF ECONOMICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course conducts a general study of the history of economics by examining specific economic thinkers and the economic development of the United States and its institutions placed within a historical context. Institutions influence our nation's economic system, culture, political process, conflict resolution mechanisms, financial systems, and labor/management boards to name a few. Due to changes in these institutions and our nation's laws over time as a product of historical events and periods, the economy differs in terms of efficiency, growth potential, and equity in allocating resources. The first course block examines, compares, and contrasts a variety of history's prominent economic thinkers and their philosophies from Adam Smith to modern economists. It explores how we think about economics in terms of historical context, theory, and the formation of various schools of economic thought. The second course block conducts an overview of the United States economy and its development through the historical context and lens of significant events and distinctive periods of American history starting with the colonies and ending with contemporary challenges facing the country. This block explores how the US government has taken deliberate steps to adjust the capitalist economic system. Included are examinations of efforts to promote economic growth, the causes and impacts of significant economic events, and steps taken to stabilize and reform the economies of nations following major military conflicts. A small part of the block is devoted to war financing. By examining these significant changes or turning points in our nation's history, cadets can better apply economic ideas to the events or periods to help understand the current relevance of the material.
2024 2
2025 2
2026 1
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS386 2017-2 POLITICAL THOUGHT 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course introduces students to the fundamental questions of political life, as expressed in classic works of political philosophy. The course presents the history of political thought as a series of debates over the meaning of justice, man's place in nature, and the human good. Students explore three main approaches to these questions - ancient, medieval, and modern - and they compare and contrast Western ways of wrestling with fundamental questions to others that have arisen outside the West. The course culminates in a consideration of the place of the American regime in the history of political thought.
2024 2
2025 1
2025 2
2026 1
2026 2
2027 1
2027 2
2027 9

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS386 2029-2 POLITICAL THOUGHT AND IDEAS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course examines the fundamental questions of Western political philosophy. In order to better understand why these problems are of vital relevance to contemporary civilization in the late modern West, students consider six themes: the nature of politics and how theorists, citizens, and statesmen have understood political things; the nature of freedom and the conditions necessary for its establishment, maintenance, preservation, and improvement; republicanism in antiquity and modernity; liberal democracy and constitutional order; the relationship between religion and politics; and, the fundamental presuppositions of traditional, modern, and contemporary social science. This course allows students to achieve critical understanding of the ancient and modern founda-tions of Western political thought and how these ideas have contributed to American republicanism, lib-eral democracy, and representative government; to clarify a range of modern political problems at home and abroad that challenge civilization; to acquire a competence reading, writing about, and discussing classic works of political philosophy, fostering life-long learning on masterpieces of human reflection; to develop cross-disciplinary capacity to study politics by (a) integrating basic chronological knowledge of what has happened in Western intellectual life, (b) understanding how to study ideas as vital compo-nents of traditional liberal education and officer development, (c) writing a Seminar Essay that synthe-sizes course learning, (d) making use of language study, grammar, etymology, and philology, and (e) keeping a Commonplace Book; to apply political thought to contemporary circumstances; and, to con-trast Western principles with a major non-Western tradition of political thought.

No Course Offerings


COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS387 2022-1 PUBLIC ECONOMICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course is an applied microeconomics course focusing on theoretical models to answer real world policy issues in the public sector. In particular, this course examines issues in public expenditures, social insurance, social welfare, redistribution, taxation, and public choice. Using economic models, this course helps students sharpen their analytical skills to solve complex governance challenges. Cadets should gain a better understanding of unique challenges that governments face when providing services while trying to balance economic efficiency with social equity.
2024 8
2024 9
2025 1
2025 8
2025 9
2026 1
2027 1
2027 8

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS388 2021-1 INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course is dedicated to the study of aggregate economic activity. The course examines the determinants of long run growth, and then addresses short run economic fluctuations. The course uses various models, including the Solow Growth Model, the IS-lM model, and the Aggregate Demand - Aggregate Supply model. The microeconomic foundations for macroeconomics are discussed, and current macroeconomic policy issues are debated. These issues are discussed within the context of both open and closed economies.
2024 2
2025 1
2025 2
2025 8
2026 1
2026 2
2026 8
2027 1
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS390 2022-1 BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course will cover how insights from psychology and behavioral economics relate to the foundational economic model of rational choice. This course will cover four main topic areas. First, the course will examine how individual preferences tend to deviate from a rational choice model. Second, the course will explore how cognitive limitations alter individual choice. Third, the course will look at how social preferences and social influence impact decisions. Fourth and finally, this course will investigate how public policy interacts with individual behavioral tendencies.
2024 2
2024 8
2025 2
2025 8
2025 9
2026 2
2027 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS391 2021-2 FINANCE FOR ARMY LEADERS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course examines analytical and practical approaches to financial management with emphasis on effective financial counseling, personal decision-making, and ethical issues in personal finance. The course begins with an overview of financial planning and introduces personal accounting, net worth calculation, cash budgeting, insurance, investment, and taxes. These principles are subsequently applied in evaluating major purchases, real estate, securities, and financial options. The financial institutions section investigates the major sources of financial instruments which an investor might purchase, and determines the nature and purpose behind the issue of such securities as well as diversification and performance measures requiring familiarity with applied regression analysis (Excel). The final sections relate to estate planning and culminate in the development and presentation in a counseling option of the cadet's ability to evaluate life's major purchases, select financial securities, counsel subordinates, and choose between financial options.**This course is a pilot (has previously been taught and archived) and will need review by the Curriculum Committee NLT AY24-1 to continue.**
2024 8

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS392 2019-2 POLITICS-RACE,GENDER,SEXUALITY 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This seminar is an introduction to the concepts of race, gender, and sexuality in the American political system. It will focus on the fundamental institutions and processes involved in our system of government, with a focus on the concepts of civil rights and liberties as they pertain to the overarching topics of discussion. Emphasis will be placed on the inherent inequalities found within the structures, rules, and processes of the American political system. The class will also move outside the borders of the United States to consider some of these same concepts in other countries to provide a comparison of how states deal with majority-minority relations and inequalities in their governmental systems. The class will consider how the contemporary issues that relate to race, gender, and sexuality apply to the Army and how they impact the Army officer.
2024 2
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS394 2024-1 FUNDAMENTALS FINANCE ANALYSIS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE Fundamentals of Financial Analysis teaches cadets: 1) the principles of financial statements from the perspective of a user of financial statements (as opposed to a preparer of financial statements); 2) the tools of understanding financial statements including ratio analysis, competitive analysis and economic analysis; and 3) how to apply the fundamentals of these analyses in a wide range of complex, real-world business cases to properly price value and risk. To accomplish this, cadets first learn how to analyze a company by exploring the principles of financial reporting and its complexities in order to be able to assess a company's measurement of its performance and financial position. Cadets then learn how to analyze an industry including capital structure, performance ratios, competitive analysis frameworks, and evaluation of business models and corporate strategy in an underlying economic environment. Cadets learn the basics of several valuation methods and understand how to use as many data points as possible, acknowledging their strengths and limitations, to holistically evaluate a firm. This course is the first of a four-course financial economics sequence which culminates with SS463: Investment Theory.
2024 2
2024 8
2025 1
2025 2
2025 8
2025 9
2026 2
2026 8
2027 1
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS395 2020-1 INTERNATIONAL SECURITY 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course uses the foundation provided by SS307/SS357 to explore one of the critical forces that drives world politics - international security. The purpose of this course is to provide students a solid foundation in the field of international security studies - one of the major sub-fields of the international relations discipline - including a grasp of key concepts and case studies relevant to the field today and throughout history. Students will examine fundamental questions in this field, including "What is security?" "What causes war, and what prevents it?" and "How do actors in the international system use force as a tool to achieve goals and influence others?" As a "Writing in the Major" course for the Security Studies and Foreign Policy track of the International Affairs major, students should expect heavy emphasis on writing assignments as a key tool for developing, communicating, and validating their understanding of course material.
2025 1
2026 1
2027 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS399 2005-4 SOCSCI INTERNSHIP/PRACTCAL EXP 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE The Academic Individual Advanced Development (AIAD) program is designed to give cadets practical experience in their field of study and to reflect on their experiences by completing specified academic requirements. Recent internships involve participation in the American, European and Russian (AMEURU) program hosted by the University of Maastricht, the Tri-Service Global Spectrum trip to Vietnam, study at the German Marshall Center, the American Institute on Political and Economic Systems (AIPES) in the Czech Republic, the International Institute for Political and Economic Studies (IIPES) in Greece, and the International Studies Program (ISP) in Eastern Europe. Scope, depth and material covered will meet the requirement of a 3-credit hour course in Social Sciences. Grades are determined based on preparatory briefings and essays, a journal of daily activities, the quality of the work performed during the internship, and a final paper, briefing, or exam that incorporates their experience with a topic from their field of study, due upon return.
2024 7
2025 7
2026 7
2027 7

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS457 2022-2 INTRODUCTION TO GRAND STRATEGY 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This seminar examines the fundamentals of grand strategy in theory and in practice. It addresses the historical moment in which the modern concept of grand strategy was born and explores the major debates that have animated scholars and practitioners since. We focus on the core building blocks of grand strategy: the elements of national power that are available to be coordinated and applied in a coherent fashion across policy contexts. We analyze historical case studies to explore how the modern concept of grand strategy can be retrospectively applied to explain state behavior across time and diverse contexts. The seminar ultimately aims to prepare future Army officers to apply concepts from grand strategy to analyze and address complex problem sets in the contemporary international environment.
2024 2
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS458 2020-1 TOPICS IN GRAND STRATEGY 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE SS458 Applied Topics in Grand Strategy is the second of a two-part sequence designed to build on the course material covered in SS457. The course will cover applied regional and thematic topics in the study of grand strategy in a contemporary and/or historical context to illustrate key theoretical concepts. Scope, depth and material covered will meet the requirement of a 3-hour credit course in the Grand Strategy Program. Grades are determined based on presentations, essays and other writing exercises, class participation, and a final exam, essay, and/or briefing.
2025 1
2026 1
2027 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS461 2020-2 LEADERSHIP ECONOMICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE Good leadership has always been defined by what worked yesterday, yet no formal discipline exists to teach you principles for dealing with unanticipated challenges and uncertainty. As you'll learn, leadership is the act of choosing to shape the world, shifting it from its current path. However, there is no single leadership formula precisely because the innovations of leaders are new creations. Instead, we will construct a framework of human action that rests on decades of research in behavioral economics and neuroscience, formalized with the mathematical tools of microeconomics. With this framework, we assess the role and appropriate application of autonomy, character and honor, humility, empathy, resilience, and more. We will also read and consider how the latest self-help and business movements fit within this framework, including "psychological capital" (PsyCap), "Immunity to Change," "Grit," and others. The key takeaway of the course will be a formalization of what it means to be people of action.
2025 1
2026 1
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS462 2020-2 ECONOMIC GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course provides an overview of major topics in the study of economic development. It combines the study of economic theories on the determinants of growth and development with a discussion of related and current empirical work. The goal is not to provide exhaustive coverage of all relevant topics, but instead to expose cadets to current issues and debates in the field of development economics. By the end of the course, cadets should be familiar with indicators of growth and development, know seminal theories and be able to assess them in light of empirical evidence, be able to read, understand, and critique current empirical research in economic development, and be able to think innovatively about policy design by drawing on and integrating theoretical and empirical research. Ultimately, cadets will be empowered as future decision-makers to better design, implement, and evaluate policy interventions.
2025 1
2026 1
2027 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS463 2021-1 INVESTMENT THEORY & APPL 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE Investment Theory and Application is designed to give cadets an appreciation of the theoretical underpinnings for investing as well as the way investors think about and approach the markets today. This course pulls from concepts in statistics, microeconomics, econometrics, accounting, and finance. Broadly, the course is organized into three interconnected blocks. Before studying the movement of prices and the measure of risk and return in the markets, investors need to understand how to value (price) a security (stock, bond, or option). After understanding these basic valuation techniques, investors can begin appreciating the relationship between risk and return in the markets and how that builds to some of the foundational theories and models in finance: modern portfolio theory, the efficiency market hypothesis, and the capital asset pricing model. Finally, after building the theoretical story of efficient markets, we will explore the counterpoint. The course concludes with a rigorous final project, where students wade through imperfect information to propose and defend recommendations for the current active portfolio within West Point's Investment Club.
2024 2
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS464 2024-1 HOMELAND SECURITY 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE The purpose of SS464 is to address the complex challenges of homeland security through an interdisciplinary approach. The goal of this course is to provide future leaders with a thorough understanding of the homeland security policy area. This course explores how the evolving nature of the terorist threat, particularly catastrophic terrorism, poses unprecedented and complex challenges to how America provides for its security. The course examines how homeland security policy intersects with other domestic and foreign policy issues, how our federalist system of government affects homeland security, and how moral, ethical, and civil liberties concerns complicate the development of effective homeland security policies. By analyzing the threat and developing an understanding of the unique policy problems and tools of homeland security, the course enables students to critically assess national efforts in such areas as border security, domestic counterterrorism policy, critical infrastructure protection, and emergency preparedness and response. Students will learn about the major policy and institutional reforms underway in the homeland security policy area, examine whether these changes are improving or will improve U.S. security policy, and develop their own views on the direction of national homeland security policy. The course will enable students to think critically about how the United States' overseas efforts to combat terrorism, preempt emerging threats, and counter the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction relate to domestic homeland security efforts. By the end of the course, students will gain a solid intellectual foundation to think critically and creatively about America's efforts to prevent terrorist attacks within the United States, reduce our vulnerability to terrorist attack, and minimize the damage and recover from attacks that may occur.
2024 2
2025 1
2025 2
2026 1
2026 2
2027 1
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS465 2019-2 TERRORISM: NEW CHALLENGES 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE The purpose of SS465, is to address the challenges of terrorism in the current and future global security environment through an interdisciplinary approach. Specifically, this course examines the unique challenge terrorism poses to liberal democratic states, policy makers and to military professionals. By analyzing the different perspectives of terrorism, given a variety of political and strategic contexts, students better understand terrorist motivations, strategies, means and ends. Finally, the course explores how a liberal democratic state can best fight terrorism in this new threat environment.
2024 2
2024 8
2025 1
2025 2
2025 8
2025 9
2026 1
2026 2
2027 1
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS466 2019-2 COMBATING TERRORISM 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE The Combating Terrorism course represents a unique opportunity for students to conduct in-depth and integrated study on the most pressing past, present, and future counterterrorism challenges to the United States and its interests. The objectives of this course are: (1) to synthesize and apply the cadet's studies across their core academic major and elective course work to the thematic issue of counterterrorism; (2) to apply methodological skills of research design, conceptual reasoning, analysis, and research gained to counterterrorism; (3) to extend the cadet's in-depth study of the selected area of interest beyond the level obtained in course work with regards to counterterrorism; (4) to design and conduct focused research; and (5) to develop cadet skills in conceptual reasoning, critical analysis, and effective writing.
2024 2
2025 1
2025 2
2026 1
2026 2
2027 1
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS468 2020-1 POLITICAL PARTICIPATION 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course provides a broad understanding of the dynamics of political participation. The goals of this course are two-fold. First, it comprehensively examines both individual and group participation, as well as the many ways in which participation manifests itself in the democratic process, namely in the form of electoral (voting, campaigning) and non-electoral behavior ("civicness", group action, etc). As such, this course will include topics in public opinion, the electoral process, and voting behavior. Second, the approach is both empirical - and theoretical. This course examines results of electoral behavior (primarily U.S. national and state elections), complemented with competing theoretical approaches which serve to explain and better understand this behavior.
2025 1
2027 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS469 2022-1 ECONOMETRICS II 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course is designed to teach students advanced concepts in estimation and statistical inference. Building upon the material covered in SS368, students will learn how to test for failure of the data to meet the assumptions of the basic regression model and how to allow for these departures from the standard assumptions during estimation. Among the topics covered will be Generalized Least Squares, Time Series, Instrumental Variables, and Simultaneous Equations estimation. Application of the techniques to the estimation of economic models using actual economic data is an integral part of the instruction. The course makes substantial use of statistical software packages.
2025 1
2026 1
2027 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS470 2020-1 MONEY AND BANKING 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE SS470 is a senior level economics course whose primary purpose is to provide depth in the student's background and understanding of macroeconomics and international economics. The focus of the course is on the financial sector of the economy, which provides the means to transfer savings from firms, households, and governments to investors who want to purchase new capital goods. The course begins by discussing the various types of financial institutions and examines the importance of financial intermediation. The course then identifies how to measure the risks faced by financial institutions and how to manage these same risks.
2024 2
2025 1
2025 2
2026 1
2026 2
2027 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS472 2021-1 SOLDIER & STATE: AM CIV-MIL RE 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This seminar explores the unique role of the soldier within our democratic republic. We begin by situating the profession of arms within the Executive branch as an agent to its direct principal, the Legislative branch. We proceed by examining the similarities and differences between the military and other agents of the administrative state. We explore the military's role in providing professional expertise in the policy process and examine current trends that threaten to undermine this advisory position. Using a historical framework, we will examine the evolution of civil-military relations in times of war, peace, and perpetual conflict. We will place particular emphasis on the theories and norms of civil-military relations in a post-9/11 world including navigating the tensions inherent to the dual role of the soldier as war fighter and state builder..
2024 2
2025 2
2026 2
2027 1
2027 2
2027 8

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS473 2022-1 AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE SS473 examines the historical evolution, development, implementation, and consequences of American foreign policy. It analyzes the actors that craft and influence policy, concentrating both on formal government institutions--such as the President, Congress, and the foreign policy bureaucracy--and informal institutions such as public opinion, political parties, interest groups, and the media. The course examines key events in American Foreign Policy history through the lens of constraints and 'policy choice.' What choices did U.S. foreign policy makers confront? What policies did they choose to implement and why? What were the consequences of those decisions? Students will ultimately apply these lessons as they evaluate historic foreign policy decisions, debate contemporary dilemmas, and contemplate the future of American foreign policy.
2024 2
2025 1
2025 2
2026 1
2026 2
2027 1
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS475 2020-2 COMP POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This courses uses the comparative method, in conjunction with political science theory, to explore and explain the wide variation in political institutions around the world. The course devotes significant attention to understanding the most basic institutional characteristic of a state: its regime type. The first portion of the course wrestles with key definitions: what are the defining characteristics of democracies? What are the defining characteristics of dictatorships and other forms of authoritarian rule? How do we understand regimes that do not fall neatly into either category? The second portion of the course explores the causes of regime transitions: when, where, how, and why does democracy emerge? When is democracy likely to collapse? When do dictatorships fail, and what type of regime results? Finally, the course explores the wide array of outcomes that are influenced by a country's political institutions: economic development, inequality, intrastate conflict, and others. As a "Writing in the Major" course for the Institutions, Governance, and Development track of the International Affairs Major, students in SS475 will develop their substantive knowledge of political institutionalism alongside their critical reading and writing skills through a series of developmental writing assignments.
2025 1
2026 1
2027 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS476 2024-1 CIVIL WARS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE SS476 covers the entire life-cycle of civil conflict from onset, to dynamics, to termination. Through the use of a rich theoretical and empirical literature on conflict and a range of political science methodologies, it examines questions such as: what causes civil wars? Why do certain patterns of violence occur in civil wars? What makes civil wars so hard to end? What is the impact of third parties on termination of civil wars? The course emphasizes the theory and practice of civil war settlement and termination with particular attention to the role of third parties.
2025 1
2026 1
2027 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS477 2019-2 ECONOMICS OF NATIONAL SECURITY 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This is a capstone course for the economics major that is designed to integrate microeconomics, macroeconomics, and econometrics. Coursework and classroom discussion require students to apply theoretical concepts and models from the major's toolbox courses, electives, and the core curriculum to policy issues inherent to the provision of national security. The course prepares students to address the broader economic challenges of national security and provides them with a baseline understanding of the economic underpinnings and ramifications of defense policy. Students use relevant databases, econometrics, and the skills they have learned as economics majors to prepare and present term research papers that analyze major defense and public policy decisions.
2024 2
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS478 2019-2 DIST PROF OF SECURITY STUD SEM 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course is taught by a visiting scholar with a distinguished record of academic achievement and professional service in the national security arena. The seminar focuses on topical issues that reflect the professor's area of expertise. Dr. Kori Schake, a former Director of Defense Strategy and Requirements for the National Security Council and presently a distinguished fellow at the Hoover Institution, serves as our current visiting scholar. In the seminar, students take part in detailed discussions, deliver presentations, conduct research, and prepare analytical papers. Students also benefit from guest speakers who share their experiences and expertise with the seminar. Previous Distinguished Professors include General (Retired) Barry R. McCaffrey, former Director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy; General (Retired) John Galvin, former commander of SACEUR and noted author; Professor Richard Shultz, Director of International Security Studies at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy; Professor Linda Brady, Director of the School of International Affairs at Georgia Institute of Technology; and Admiral (Retired) Stansfield Turner, former President of the Naval War College and Director of the Central Intelligence Agency.
2024 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS479 2020-2 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE While occasionally individual states in the international system have sought to find the solution to problems that they face alone - be they security-related, financial, social or environmental - the nature of the 21st century's geopolitical issues almost demand a collective, transnational response. But what entity or entities serve to facilitate this transnational cooperation? Enter international organizations, or IOs. This course is centered on introducing students to the landscape of global IOs that exist in the world today. To that end, this course investigates the emergence, purposes, and contemporary statuses of a variety of the major IOs that mark the international relations landscape today. These will include global IOs (like the United Nations, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, the World Trade Organization, the International Criminal Court), regional IOs (like the European Union [EU], African Union [AU], and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations [ASEAN]); and a variety of non-governmental organizations (NGOs)(like Doctors Without Borders, Amnesty International, and the International Committee of the Red Cross). The course also assesses the impact and relevance of international organizations as an issue of concern to Army officers and national security professionals.

No Course Offerings


COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS480 2019-2 PUBLIC POLICYMAKING PROCESS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE SS480 is the capstone course for American Politics majors in the Social Sciences Department. This course examines the major concepts, theoretical frameworks, and substantive dilemmas of the public policymaking process. The aim of this course is to arm students with a myriad of tools to understand, evaluate, and contextualize specific political problems in the public policy arena. Students will be expected to integrate the concepts of not only basic, toolbox, and elective courses, but knowledge acquired from other courses from other disciplines. Public policy spans the disciplines of politics, economics, sociology, philosophy, and psychology, as policymakers wrestle with developing and implementing value-laden decisions in a world of scarcity and uncertainty. As such, the student of public policy must use a variety of social science tools - and increasingly, physical science tools, to dissect policy problems, develop viable and feasible alternatives, and fashion methods of adoption and implementation. Consequently, this course is designed to build upon the student's conceptual and analytical base in the quest to establish and refine a systematic approach to public policy analysis, formulation, adoption, and implementation.
2024 2
2024 8
2024 9
2025 2
2025 8
2025 9
2026 2
2027 2
2027 8

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS481 2019-2 POLITICS OF DEFENSE POLICY 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This seminar is a survey of the politics that shape America's policy decisions over war and peace. We study the domestic influences of foreign policy and the international political dynamics that shape why and how America intervenes. It is an examination of American national security policy and institutions using theoretical, historical, and practical perspectives. Drawing from various literatures, we examine and evaluate the choices our nation makes in defense policy decisions. We address questions concerning military innovation and adaptation, change and transition in the armed services, defense resources, and capacities of actors in the defense policy arena. Using the lens of "grand strategy," we examine how defense policy decisions are influenced by a broad and complex array of political and economic factors and how these decisions shape future domestic and foreign policy environments.
2024 2
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS483 2020-2 NATIONAL SECURITY SEMINAR 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course helps cadets to improve their ability to analyze the national security choices of the United States. An underlying premise is that it is useful to think strategically about national security. To think strategically means to keep in mind the need to identify and to reconcile ends, ways, and means when seeking to advance the national interests of the United States. Sound in theory, this approach is hard to implement in practice. This course introduces cadets to actors, processes, and issues that influence US national security decisions and gives cadets a greater appreciation for the challenges associated with making and implementing national security policy.
2024 2
2024 8
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2
2027 8

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS484 2019-2 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course integrates economic principles taken in SS382 and SS388. International Economics promotes understanding of the economic causes and effects of international trade, examines the justifications for and effectiveness of a variety of trade policies, explains and critiques the international flow of money, and explores the impact of these topics upon individual firms in the marketplace. The course?s methodology rests on theoretical concepts and models such as profit maximization, market equilibrium, preference maximization, and macroeconomic equilibrium. The course is divided into four blocks. The first three blocks investigate the theory of international trade in goods and comparative advantage, the practice of international trade and international political economy, and the workings of international monetary markets. The final block compels cadets to apply their estimates of the international macroeconomic environment to choices made by national governments.
2024 2
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS485 2020-2 POLITICS SUB-SAHARAN AFR 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This is a discussion-based seminar course designed to survey the origins and dimensions of contemporary issues within the post-colonial, sub-Saharan African state. The concepts of democracy, institutionalization, political economy, war, and peace remain a complex landscape for many African states. Focusing on theoretical work and case studies, cadets will examine sub-Saharan Africa's historical experiences, its economic heritage, and the international context in which it is embedded. At the same time, cadets will explore how Africans have shaped their own political and economic situations. Using social science methods, cadets will gain an understanding of how context shapes political behavior, in general, and how historical and political forces have influenced African politics, in particular.
2025 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS486 2020-2 STATE BUILDING 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE SS486 examines states and state building in the modern world. Whether one focuses on international relations, comparative politics, or American politics, the state remains a critical component to our understanding of political life. Cadets in this course engage a robust theoretical literature that forms the foundation for an understanding of contemporary and future state building efforts. Throughout the course, we explore major theories of state formation such as warfare, economic development, and institutions. Next, the course adopts the view of the state and investigates a critical challenge confronting civilian and military leaders - why do some states become strong and others weak? Subsequently, we adopt the view of the civil society and examine state building dynamics from the vantage of those whom the state seeks to rule. Finally, the course examines how the state building project functions around the world through a variety of regional case studies. Cadets completing this course join a small but critical set of military officers prepared to lead and advise the next state building project.
2024 2
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS487 2020-2 INT'L POLITICAL ECONOMY 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE SS487 serves as an introduction to the complex and fascinating fundamental relationships between politics, economics, and society at the international and domestic levels. How do political institutions, actors, and policies shape international economic phenomena? And how do these economic phenomena influence political forces in turn? Though international political economy falls within the broader subfield of international relations, we will soon discover that domestic politics and economics cannot be separated from international political economy. Thus, students will explore the mechanisms that link politics and economics across a variety of issues that are central to the field of IPE, including the politics and economics of trade, economic development, international monetary affairs, and emerging challenges in the global economy.
2024 2
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS489A 2020-2 SENIOR RESEARCH AMER POLITICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE The course provides an environment that is conducive to independent effort in a subject area of special interest to the cadet. Original research or specialized study will be accomplished in the field of American Politics. The course is conducted in three phases. First, the cadet and the individual tutor from the Social Sciences faculty will reach agreement on a subject area for research. Research methods will be studied under the direction of the faculty member. Research may involve field trips and personal interviews with experts in the area of study. In the second phase, the cadet will engage in independent research and prepare a draft analytical paper or report detailing the findings. During this period, frequent consultation with the faculty advisor occurs regarding the progress in the project. In the third phase, the cadet will present and defend the findings before a faculty committee. This course is the first in a two-part thesis program in the fall and encompasses individual projects in the spring.
2025 1
2026 1
2027 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS489B 2020-2 SENIOR RESEARCH INTERN AFFAIRS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE The course provides an environment that is conducive to independent effort in a subject area of special interest to the cadet. Original research or specialized study will be accomplished in the field of International Affairs. The course is conducted in three phases. First, the cadet and the individual tutor from the Social Sciences faculty will reach agreement on a subject area for research. Research methods will be studied under the direction of the faculty member. Research may involve field trips and personal interviews with experts in the area of study. In the second phase, the cadet will engage in independent research and prepare a draft analytical paper or report detailing the findings. During this period, frequent consultation with the faculty advisor occurs regarding the progress in the project. In the third phase, the cadet will present and defend the findings before a faculty committee. This course is the first in a two-part thesis program.
2024 2
2025 1
2025 2
2026 1
2026 8
2027 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS489C 2021-1 RESEARCH METHODS IN ECONOMICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course is the first phase of the Senior Thesis in Economics sequence and offers cadets an opportunity to develop their research skills, through a combination of lectures and tutorial-style guided independent study, with the goal of preparing for the Senior Thesis in Economics. Cadets will develop economic research projects from the idea-phase through the literature review, data acquisition/analysis, and writing phases in an iterative process of producing intermediate drafts of project components and receiving instructor feedback. This will culminate in an initial draft of their senior thesis project. At the same time, lectures and assignments will cover various topics related to economic research, including strategies for generating research ideas, writing in economics, programming in STATA, data management strategies, and common empirical approaches for causal inference.
2024 2
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS490A 2019-2 COLLOQUIUM (AMER POLITICS) 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE The colloquium provides cadets an opportunity for reading and analysis in depth in a topic area of special interest and timely relevance to their concentration. The course employs the seminar approach in which the instructor meets with small groups to discuss assigned readings, and cadets present their own analyses to the group. Course directors develop topics and determine the semesters in which they will be offered. Department Academic Counselors then forward course offerings and descriptions to Social Science majors and those majoring in areas related to the colloquium topic. Topics will vary by year but recent SS490 colloquiums include: Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict; Politics and Film; the Politics of Intelligence; Politics and Government of South and Southeast Asia; Philosophy, Religion, and Terror; and Winning the Peace.
2024 2
2025 1
2026 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS490B 2020-2 COLLOQUIUM (INTERNTL AFFAIRS) 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE The colloquium provides cadets an opportunity for reading and analysis in depth in a topic area of special interest and timely relevance to their concentration. The course employs the seminar approach in which the instructor meets with small groups to discuss assigned readings, and cadets present their own analyses to the group. Course directors develop topics and determine the semesters in which they will be offered. Department Academic Counselors then forward course offerings and descriptions to Social Science majors and those majoring in areas related to the colloquium topic. Topics will vary by year but recent SS490 colloquiums include: Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict; Politics and Film; the Politics of Intelligence; Politics and Government of South and Southeast Asia; Philosophy, Religion, and Terror; and Winning the Peace.

No Course Offerings


COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS490C 2020-2 COLLOQUIUM (ECONOMICS) 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE The colloquium provides cadets an opportunity for reading and analysis in depth in a topic area of special interest and timely relevance to their concentration. The course employs the seminar approach in which the instructor meets with small groups to discuss assigned readings, and cadets present their own analyses to the group. Course directors develop topics and determine the semesters in which they will be offered. Department Academic Counselors then forward course offerings and descriptions to Social Science majors and those majoring in areas related to the colloquium topic. Topics will vary by year but recent SS490 colloquiums include: Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict; Politics and Film; the Politics of Intelligence; Politics and Government of South and Southeast Asia; Philosophy, Religion, and Terror; and Winning the Peace.
2024 2
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS490E 2020-2 SOCIAL SCIENCES COLLOQUIUM 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE The colloquium provides cadets an opportunity for reading and analysis in depth in a topic area of special interest and timely relevance to their concentration. The course employs the seminar approach in which the instructor meets with small groups to discuss assigned readings, and cadets present their own analyses to the group. Course directors develop topics and determine the semesters in which they will be offered. Department Academic Counselors then forward course offerings and descriptions to Social Science majors and those majoring in areas related to the colloquium topic. Topics will vary by year but recent SS490 colloquiums include: Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict; Politics and Film; the Politics of Intelligence; Politics and Government of South and Southeast Asia; Philosophy, Religion, and Terror; and Winning the Peace.
2025 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS491 2020-2 SENIOR PROJECT 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE SS491 is one of three capstone courses that cadets may choose to take in their senior year to serve as the integrative experience within the International Affairs Major. In SS491, cadets will be placed into small groups under the direction of a faculty member to complete an in-depth research project based on cadet research interests. Research projects may be oriented toward the needs and interests of an external "client" organization in the government, civilian academia, or the private sector. In addition to producing a written research report, each research group will present their projects to the West Point community and, if applicable, to the external client organization or other audiences.
2024 2
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS492 2019-2 DIST PROF DEF ECON SEMINAR 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course is taught by the Bernard Rogers Distinguished Professor of Defense Economics, a scholar with a distinguished record of academic achievement and professional service in the arena of Defense Economics. This course is focused on topical issues that allow students to benefit from the specific expertise of the Rogers Chair. Students typically take part in seminar discussions, conduct research, and prepare analytical papers. Potential topics are Army procurement policy, contract design, the growth of military technology, the Department of Defense budget process, and corporate finance in the defense sector.

No Course Offerings


COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS493 2019-2 SENIOR STUDIES - AMER POLITICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course provides cadets an opportunity for reading and analysis in depth in a topic area of special interest and timely relevance to their concentration. The course employs the seminar approach in which a senior faculty member meets with small groups to discuss assigned readings, and cadets present their own analyses to the group. Course directors develop topics and determine the semesters in which they will be offered. Department Academic Counselors then forward course offerings and descriptions to Social Science majors and those majoring in areas related to the senior studies topic. Topics will vary by year but recent senior studies include: Politics of Race, Gender, Sexuality and Politics, Studies in Grand Strategy, State and Local Politics, and Judicial Politics.
2024 2
2024 8
2025 1
2025 2
2026 1
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS493A 2020-2 SENIOR STUDIES - SOC SCIENCES 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course provides cadets an opportunity for reading and analysis in depth in a topic area of special interest and timely relevance to their concentration. The course employs the seminar approach in which a senior faculty member meets with small groups to discuss assigned readings, and cadets present their own analyses to the group. Course directors develop topics and determine the semesters in which they will be offered. Department Academic Counselors then forward course offerings and descriptions to Social Science majors and those majoring in areas related to the senior studies topic. Topics will vary by year but recent senior studies include: Politics of Race, Gender, Sexuality and Politics, Studies in Grand Strategy, State and Local Politics, and Judicial Politics.
2025 1
2025 2
2026 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS494 2019-2 PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course applies economic principles to the financial decisions that businesses make every day, and to the capital markets in which households and firms interact. The course covers topics including project analysis using net present value techniques, risk and return of assets and projects, efficient capital markets, corporate capital structure and dividend policy, and valuation of assets. Cadets will learn methods to analyze individual projects as well as business enterprises as a whole. As the U. S. Military continues to privatize many functions, knowledge of techniques used by corporations is becoming essential for our future Army leaders. This course is the second of a two-course financial economics sequence for which SS394 ? Financial Statement Analysis is a prerequisite, except for cadets with permission of the instructor.
2025 1
2026 1
2027 1
2027 8

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS495 2020-2 SENIOR FACULTY COLLOQUIUM 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE SS495 is one of three capstone courses that cadets may choose to take in their senior year to serve as the integrative experience within the International Affairs Major. In SS495, a senior faculty member in the International Affairs Program will develop an in-depth exploration of a selected topic to present to cadets in a seminar format. As cadets study the course material and pursue an individual research project relating to the seminar theme, they will draw on and integrate the skills and knowledge learned in previous core, major, and CSC courses.
2024 2
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS497 2019-2 ISSUES IN MICROECONOMIC THEORY 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course provides cadets an opportunity for reading and analysis in depth in a topic area of special interest and timely relevance to their concentration. The course employs the seminar approach in which a senior faculty member meets with small groups to discuss assigned readings, and cadets present their own analyses to the group. Course directors develop topics and determine the semesters in which they will be offered. Department Academic Counselors then forward course offerings and descriptions to Social Science majors and those majoring in areas related to the senior studies topic. Topics will vary by year but recent senior studies include: Homeland Security, Advanced Terrorism, and Environmental Economics.
2025 1
2026 1
2027 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS498 2020-2 SENIOR THESIS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course is taken in the spring term of the senior year and comprises the second and final phase of the Senior Thesis in Economics, International Affairs, or American Politics. This course is reserved for cadets participating in the thesis program for their selected major. International Affairs Majors must take SS489 in the Fall term to enroll in SS498. Economics Majors must take an extra elective (normally SS469 Econometrics II) during the Fall term to enroll in SS498. American Politics Majors must take an extra elective (normally SS480 Public Policy Making Process) during the Fall term to enroll in SS498.

No Course Offerings


COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS498A 2020-2 SENIOR THESIS IN AMER POLITICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course is taken in the spring term of the senior year and comprises the second and final phase of the Senior Thesis in American Politics. Cadets enrolled in SS498A normally will complete SS489A Senior Research Seminar in American Politics in the fall semester of their senior year, where they will complete a prospectus, literature review, annotated bibliography, outlines, and initial draft of their senior thesis. In SS498A, students will continue work on an independent study basis with their thesis advisor and committee, conducting further research and updating drafts to produce a final written thesis product generally ranging from 30-50 pages in length. Students defend their thesis before a committee in the last two weeks of classes.
2024 2
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS498B 2020-2 SENIOR THESIS IN INTER AFFAIRS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course is taken in the spring term of the senior year and comprises the second and final phase of the Senior Thesis in International Affairs. Cadets enrolled in SS498B normally will complete SS489B Senior Research Seminar in International Affairs in the fall semester of their senior year, where they will complete a prospectus, literature review, annotated bibliography, outlines, and initial draft of their senior thesis. In SS498B, students will continue work on an independent study basis with their thesis advisor and committee, conducting further research and updating drafts to produce a final written thesis product generally ranging from 30-50 pages in length. Students defend their thesis before a committee in the last two weeks of classes.
2024 2
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
SS498C 2021-1 SENIOR THESIS IN ECONOMICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course is taken in the spring term of the senior year and comprises the second and final phase of the Senior Thesis in Economics sequence. Cadets enrolled in SS498C normally will have completed SS489C Research Methods in Economics, where they will have developed a promising initial draft of their senior thesis. In SS498, students will continue work on an independent study basis with their thesis advisor and committee, conducting further research and updating drafts to produce a final written thesis product generally ranging from 25-50 pages in length. Students defend their thesis before a committee in the last two weeks of classes.
2024 2
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
XH200 2024-2 AMBITION AND HUBRIS 1.5
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This course considers the role of ambition in a good life, how the best-laid plans of ambitious individuals sometimes go wrong, and how leaders in all fields of human endeavor can balance ambition and humility to set goals that are both lofty and achievable, while responding properly to setbacks and failure. Students engage these and related questions through close study of a single text in a small seminar setting. The text for each year's course will be selected by the professor offering the seminar; it will in each case be a fundamental text from the professor's field that has had a decisive impact on his or her development. In the culminating assignment, students write an essay describing how, in light of the lessons they have learned from the work they have studied, they intend to improve their own character and the world around them.
2024 2
2025 2
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
XH300 2022-1 PURPOSE 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE The purpose of XH300 (formerly XH497) is to improve cadets' ability to evaluate complex issues involving ethical judgements and choice among scarce resources, reach reasoned positions on these issues, and effectively argue their positions verbally and in writing. The process of pursuing this goal will make cadets better officers, scholars, and citizens. The course will employ several methods to assist in this pursuit. First, it will achieve breadth by focusing on current issues from a variety of fields, examining the "hard choices" that confront society, government, military leaders, and individual citizens. Among the disciplines from which the course will draw are Philosophy, Law, Political Science, Economics, Physics, Biology, and English. Each cadet will also be assigned an individual mentor from among the faculty of the Departments of Social Sciences, History, Law, or English. Requirements include a briefing on a current issue in the cadet's major field, a book review, and a personal statement summarizing academic and other goals.
2024 2
2024 8
2024 9
2025 2
2025 8
2025 9
2026 2
2027 2

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
XH397 2022-7 GRAND STRATEGY FIELD STUDY 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE The Grand Strategy Field Study AIAD experience provides the opportunity to apply theories of grand strategy to real-world historical and contemporary events. Through travel to a place of grand strategic importance - whether the ruins of the Athenian Empire, the decisive battlefields of World War II, or such new arenas of Great Power competition as the Indo-Pacific - cadets will gain a deep first-hand understanding of the geopolitical, cultural, economic, and technological factors shaping grand strategy throughout history and in the present day. Scope, depth, and material covered will satisfy the requirement of a 3-credit hour course in the Grand Strategy program.
2024 7
2025 7
2027 7

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
XH407 2023-1 VISION AND RHETORIC 1.5
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE The purpose of XH407 Vision and Rhetoric is to build upon the foundation of critical thought established in XH300 Purpose. Cadets apply the concepts developed in XH300 to contemporary issues facing the United States Army, Department of Defense, Nation, and wider world. Cadets continue to refine their understanding of their place in the society and develop skills to convey this sense of self to others, both verbally and in writing. Cadets will continue to be advised by both Department of Social Sciences faculty and academic advisors in their home departments.
2025 1
2027 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
XH476 2024-1 TUTORIAL IN AM FNDTNS 1.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE This tutorial employs one-on-one or small group discussions to examine selected texts from the period of the American founding utilizing diverse disciplinary perspectives. In consultation with a faculty supervisor, cadets select an area of focus (e.g., Tom Paine?s Common Sense, the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, etc.) as the basis for a tailored reading program. Areas of focus may vary year to year in accordance with student interest and faculty expertise. The course meets for approximately 750 minutes (10 meetings x 75 minutes) and concludes with an oral examination by a committee of faculty members representing different disciplines.
2025 1
2026 1

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
ZH337 2020-1 REGIONAL POLITICAL SYSTEMS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE For cadets attending foreign military academies and academic institutions. Instruction may be in English or a foreign language. Cadets will attend classes and produce papers and other academic work as required by the course instructor and the institution's academic requirements. This class serves as the equivalent to a foreign course covering the politics, societies, and structures of states in different regions of the world. The course also covers the study of the relationship between the state and society in these regions. Regions include--but are not limited to--the Middle East, East Asia, Southwest Asia, Central Asia, North Africa, South Africa, Latin America, South America, and Europe.
2024 8
2024 9
2025 8
2025 9
2026 8
2026 9
2027 8
2027 9

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
ZH347 2020-1 INT'L ORGNZTNS & INSTITUTIONS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE For cadets attending foreign military academies and academic institutions. Instruction may be in English or a foreign language. Cadets will attend classes and produce papers and other academic work as required by the course instructor and the institution's academic requirements. This class serves as the equivalent to a foreign course about international regimes, international institutions, and / or international organizations and the structure, role, and relevance of these actors in the international system. In addition, course content may include material about the relationship between international organizations and institutions and states. International organizations and institutions studied may include--but are not limited to--the United Nations, NATO, the European Union, International Economic Organizations, the International Criminal Court, and the Kyoto Protocol / other Climate Change Institutions.
2024 8
2024 9
2025 8
2025 9
2026 8
2026 9
2027 8
2027 9

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
ZH367 2019-2 TOPICS IN MICROECONOMICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE For cadets attending foreign military academies and academic institutions. Instruction may be in English or in a foreign language. Cadets will attend classes and produce papers and other academic work as required by the course instructor and the institution's academic requirements. This class serves as the equivalent to a foreign course about topics covered in the study of microeconomics. Topics include, but are not limited to, history of economic thought, manpower and labor economics, public and social policy issues, energy and natural resource issues, gender, law, and applied microeconomic issues.
2024 8
2024 9
2025 8
2025 9
2026 8
2026 9
2027 8
2027 9

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
ZH377 2019-2 TOPICS IN MACROECONOMICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE For cadets attending foreign military academies and academic institutions. Instruction may be in English or in a foreign language. Cadets will attend classes and produce papers and other academic work as required by the course instructor and the institution?s academic requirements. This class serves as the equivalent to a foreign course about topics covered in the study of macroeconomics. Topics include?but are not limited to?international trade, foreign exchange, the international monetary system, global capital markets, and globalization.
2025 8
2025 9
2026 8
2026 9
2027 8
2027 9

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
ZH407 2020-1 TOPICS/AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE For cadets attending foreign military academies and academic institutions. Instruction may be in English or a foreign language. Cadets will attend classes and produce papers and other academic work as required by the course instructor and the institution?s academic requirements. This class serves as the equivalent to a foreign course covering the development, implementation, and consequences of American foreign policy. It analyzes the actors who make American foreign policy, concentrating both on government sources such as the President, Congress, and the foreign policy bureaucracy, as well as external sources such as public opinion, interest groups, and the media. Topics include - but are not limited to - U.S. relations with China, Russia, and the European Union, energy politics, the Arab-Israeli crisis, weapons of mass destruction and rogue states, terrorism, democracy promotion, and the global response to US foreign policy. In exploring each of these current challenges and dilemmas, this course attempts to understand the policies and strategies the U.S. utilizes to secure its interests and achieve its objectives.

No Course Offerings


COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
ZH427 2020-1 TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE For cadets attending foreign military academies and academic institutions. Instruction may be in English or a foreign language. Cadets will attend classes and produce papers and other academic work as required by the course instructor and the institution?s academic requirements. This class serves as the equivalent to a foreign course covering the history and development of state social structures, political cultures, and systems and structures of government. Topics include?but are not limited to?democratization, regional anthropology, and conflict resolution.
2024 8
2024 9
2025 8
2025 9
2026 8
2026 9
2027 8
2027 9

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
ZH447 2020-1 TOPICS: INTERNATIONAL POLITICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE For cadets attending foreign military academies and academic institutions. Instruction may be in English or in a foreign language. Cadets will attend classes and produce papers and other academic work as required by the course instructor and the institution's academic requirements. This class serves as the equivalent to a foreign course about topics covered in the study of international relations. Topics include--but are not limited to--international security studies, international political economy, economic development, and the history of the development of modern international relations and the international system.
2024 8
2024 9
2025 8
2025 9
2026 8
2026 9
2027 8
2027 9

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
ZH467 2019-2 TOPICS-INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE For cadets attending foreign military academies and academic institutions. Instruction may be in English or a foreign language. Cadets will attend classes and produce papers and other academic work as required by the course instructor and the institution's academic requirements. This class serves as the equivalent to a foreign course about international economic systems, international institutions, and / or international organizations and the structure, role, and relevance of these actors in the global economic system. In addition, course content may include material about the relationship between international organizations and institutions and states. International organizations and institutions studied may include - but are not limited to - the United Nations, World Bank, International Monetary Fund, the European Union, World Trade Organization, the Bretton Woods system and International Financial Organizations. Topics include - but are not limited to - international political economy, economic development, regional economics, and the history of the modern international economic system.
2024 8
2024 9
2025 8
2025 9
2026 8
2026 9
2027 8
2027 9

COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
ZH477 2019-2 TOPICS-INT'L BUSINESS/FINANCE 3.0
(BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
Scope Offerings
SCOPE For cadets attending foreign military academies and academic institutions. Instruction may be in English or a foreign language. Cadets will attend classes and produce papers and other academic work as required by the course instructor and the institution's academic requirements. This class serves as the equivalent to a foreign course about international and foreign financial systems, international accounting and foreign business practices. In addition, course content may include material about the relationship between businesses, institutions and states in foreign countries. Topics include--but are not limited to--corporate finance, financial statements and accounting, currency issues, central banking, and commercial and retail banking.
2024 8
2024 9
2025 8
2025 9
2026 8
2026 9
2027 8
2027 9