Course Search | Main

SS475 COURSE DETAILS


7 Version(s) of this Course

SS475 (Version: 2020 1) COURSE DETAILS (ARCHIVED)


COURSE TITLE EFF YEAR EFF TERM DEPARTMENT CREDIT HOURS
SS475 COMP POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS 2020 1 Social Sciences 3.0 (BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
SCOPE
This courses uses the comparative method, in conjunction with political science theory, to explore and explain the wide variation in political institutions around the world. The course devotes significant attention to understanding the most basic institutional characteristic of a state: its regime type. The first portion of the course wrestles with key definitions: what are the defining characteristics of democracies? What are the defining characteristics of dictatorships and other forms of authoritarian rule? How do we understand regimes that do not fall neatly into either category? The second portion of the course explores the causes of regime transitions: when, where, how, and why does democracy emerge? When is democracy likely to collapse? When do dictatorships fail, and what type of regime results? Finally, the course explores the wide array of outcomes (or "dependent variables") that are influenced by a country's political institutions: economic development, inequality, intrastate conflict, and others.
LESSONS: 30 @ 75 min (2.000 Att/wk) LABS: 0 @ 0 min
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS:
Research paper and oral presentation.

SS475 COURSE REQUISITES


TYPE COURSE EFF YEAR EFF TERM TRACK RED BOOK FLG
CO REQUISITE  
  SS307 2004 1 1 Y
  SS366 2005 1 1 Y
  SS357 2004 1 2 Y
  SS366 2005 1 2 Y
PRE REQUISITE  
  SS202 2009 1 1 Y
  SS252 1979 1 2 Y

SS475 (Version: 2020 2) COURSE DETAILS


COURSE TITLE EFF YEAR EFF TERM DEPARTMENT CREDIT HOURS
SS475 COMP POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS 2020 2 Social Sciences 3.0 (BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
SCOPE
This courses uses the comparative method, in conjunction with political science theory, to explore and explain the wide variation in political institutions around the world. The course devotes significant attention to understanding the most basic institutional characteristic of a state: its regime type. The first portion of the course wrestles with key definitions: what are the defining characteristics of democracies? What are the defining characteristics of dictatorships and other forms of authoritarian rule? How do we understand regimes that do not fall neatly into either category? The second portion of the course explores the causes of regime transitions: when, where, how, and why does democracy emerge? When is democracy likely to collapse? When do dictatorships fail, and what type of regime results? Finally, the course explores the wide array of outcomes that are influenced by a country's political institutions: economic development, inequality, intrastate conflict, and others. As a "Writing in the Major" course for the Institutions, Governance, and Development track of the International Affairs Major, students in SS475 will develop their substantive knowledge of political institutionalism alongside their critical reading and writing skills through a series of developmental writing assignments.
LESSONS: 30 @ 75 min (2.000 Att/wk) LABS: 0 @ 0 min
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS:
At the discretion of the current course director.

SS475 COURSE REQUISITES


TYPE COURSE EFF YEAR EFF TERM TRACK RED BOOK FLG
PRE REQUISITE  
  SS202 2009 1 1 Y
  SS307 2019 2 1 Y
  SS366 2019 2 1 Y
  SS252 1979 1 2 Y
  SS357 2019 2 2 Y
  SS366 2019 2 2 Y

SS475 (Version 2020-2) COURSE OFFERINGS


AYT #SECT/SIZE CPBLTY ENRLD WAIT SEATS CLOSED CRSE DIRECTOR DETAILS
2024 - 1 3 18 54 30 0 24 N DR PERSON Hours

2025 - 1 2 18 36 35 3 1 N Hours

2026 - 1 3 18 54 11 0 43 N DR JEE Hours


SS475 (Version: 2018 2) COURSE DETAILS (ARCHIVED)


COURSE TITLE EFF YEAR EFF TERM DEPARTMENT CREDIT HOURS
SS475 COMP POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS 2018 2 Social Sciences 3.0 (BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
SCOPE
This courses uses the comparative method, in conjunction with political science theory, to explore and explain the wide variation in political institutions around the world. The course devotes significant attention to understanding the most basic institutional characteristic of a state: its regime type. The first portion of the course wrestles with key definitions: what are the defining characteristics of democracies? What are the defining characteristics of dictatorships and other forms of authoritarian rule? How do we understand regimes that do not fall neatly into either category? The second portion of the course explores the causes of regime transitions: when, where, how, and why does democracy emerge? When is democracy likely to collapse? When do dictatorships fail, and what type of regime results? Finally, the course explores the wide array of outcomes (or "dependent variables") that are influenced by a country's political institutions: economic development, inequality, intrastate conflict, and others.
LESSONS: 40 @ 55 min (2.500 Att/wk) LABS: 0 @ 0 min
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS:
Research paper and oral presentation.

SS475 COURSE REQUISITES


TYPE COURSE EFF YEAR EFF TERM TRACK RED BOOK FLG
CO REQUISITE  
  SS307 2004 1 1 Y
  SS366 2005 1 1 Y
  SS357 2004 1 2 Y
  SS366 2005 1 2 Y
PRE REQUISITE  
  SS202 2009 1 1 Y
  SS252 1979 1 2 Y

SS475 (Version: 2006 1) COURSE DETAILS (ARCHIVED)


COURSE TITLE EFF YEAR EFF TERM DEPARTMENT CREDIT HOURS
SS475 DEMOCRATIZATION 2006 1 Social Sciences 3.0 (BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
SCOPE
This course explores the fundamental political concepts of democracy and democratization. The assigned readings examine the normative and practical underpinnings of democracy, as well as the specific causes and potential reversals -- of the "Third Wave" of democratization that has spread throughout the world over the past three decades. The course also debates effective American policy choices for newly emergent democracies that often suffer from instability and inequality. SS475 places particular emphasis on the states of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, and on the problem of constructing a new post-Soviet security architecture in a context of democratization. The course also applies democratization concepts to the Middle East with case studies in Iraq and Afghanistan.
LESSONS: 40 @ 55 min (2.500 Att/wk) LABS: 0 @ 0 min
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS:
Research paper and oral presentation.

SS475 COURSE REQUISITES


TYPE COURSE EFF YEAR EFF TERM TRACK RED BOOK FLG
CO REQUISITE  
  SS307 2004 1 1 Y
  SS366 2005 1 1 Y
  SS357 2004 1 2 Y
  SS366 2005 1 2 Y
PRE REQUISITE  
  SS202 2009 1 1 Y
  SS252 1979 1 2 Y

SS475 (Version: 2004 1) COURSE DETAILS (ARCHIVED)


COURSE TITLE EFF YEAR EFF TERM DEPARTMENT CREDIT HOURS
SS475 DEMOCRATIZATION 2004 1 Social Sciences 3.0 (BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
SCOPE
This course explores the fundamental political concepts of democracy and democratization. The assigned readings examine the normative and practical underpinnings of democracy, as well as the specific causes ŭ and potential reversals -- of the ŭThird Waveŭ of democratization that has spread throughout the world over the past three decades. The course also debates effective American policy choices for newly emergent democracies that often suffer from instability and inequality. SS475 places particular emphasis on the states of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, and on the problem of constructing a new post-Soviet security architecture in a context of democratization.
LESSONS: 40 @ 55 min (2.500 Att/wk) LABS: 0 @ 0 min
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS:
Research paper and oral presentation.

SS475 COURSE REQUISITES


TYPE COURSE EFF YEAR EFF TERM TRACK RED BOOK FLG
PRE REQUISITE  
  SS307 2004 1 1 Y
  SS357 2004 1 2 Y

SS475 (Version: 2003 1) COURSE DETAILS (ARCHIVED)


COURSE TITLE EFF YEAR EFF TERM DEPARTMENT CREDIT HOURS
SS475 DEMOCRATIZATION 2003 1 Social Sciences 3.0 (BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
SCOPE
Despite the initial euphoria generated by the fall of communism in the region, the transition to market democracy has stalled in much of Central and Eastern Europe. Instead of thriving market economies based on privatized industries, and civil societies that organize to defend their interests, many countries in the region possess a fragile, state-subsidized economy and a "democracy" defended by a weak civil society and ineffective and unrepresentative political institutions. SS475 assesses the foreign and security policies of contemporary Central Europe and the vital process of democratization, marketization, nation-building, and state-building. Additionally, this course examines these developments and the effects on U.S. national security. The course is designed for the serious student and demands rigorous attention to assigned readings.
LESSONS: 40 @ 55 min (2.500 Att/wk) LABS: 0 @ 0 min
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS:
Research paper and oral presentation; compensatory time provided.

SS475 COURSE REQUISITES


TYPE COURSE EFF YEAR EFF TERM TRACK RED BOOK FLG
PRE REQUISITE  
  SS307 1979 1 1 Y
  SS357 1979 1 2 Y

SS475 (Version: 1982 2) COURSE DETAILS (ARCHIVED)


COURSE TITLE EFF YEAR EFF TERM DEPARTMENT CREDIT HOURS
SS475 CENTRAL EUROPEAN SECURITY 1982 2 Social Sciences 3.0 (BS=0.0, ET=0.0, MA=0.0)
SCOPE
This course is a seminar designed to further student understanding of security in the area between the Atlantic Ocean and the Ural Mountains. The course assesses the evolution of security on the continent since 1945. In addition to basic realist concepts (power, polarity, the security dilemma, etc.), SS475 will also highlight the role of European and extra European great powers, as well as their respective strategic cultures. Whenever possible, political phenomenon will be viewed from U.S., Russian, and Central European perspectives. The course covers the following subdivisions: the Cold War; Security in the 1980s; Transition to a New Security Regime; "New" Issues in European Security; and the Architectural Aspects of the Future European Security Regimes.
LESSONS: 40 @ 55 min (2.500 Att/wk) LABS: 0 @ 0 min
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS:
Research paper and oral presentation.

SS475 COURSE REQUISITES


TYPE COURSE EFF YEAR EFF TERM TRACK RED BOOK FLG
PRE REQUISITE  
  SS307 1979 1 1 Y
  SS357 1979 1 2 Y